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  • Opioid-Sparing Protocol Cuts Opioid Use After Arthroscopy

    Postoperative consumption of opioids over six weeks reduced with multimodal opioid-sparing protocol for managing pain following arthroscopic shoulder or knee surgery

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  • New trial to ease knee pain in school kids

    One in four adolescents experience pain in their kneecaps that, if left untreated, can continue into adulthood, leading to reduced physical activity and quality of life. With research highlighting the need for early intervention, a new trial from Deakin University's Center for Sport Research is exploring whether changing the type of school shoes kids wear could be part of the solution.

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  • Treatment of neurogenic scapular winging: a systematic review on outcomes after non-surgical management and tendon transfer surgery.

    Scapular winging is a rare condition of the shoulder girdle which presents challenging treatment decisions for clinicians. To inform clinical practice, clinicians need guidance on what the best treatment decision is for their patients and such recommendations should be based on the total evidence available. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to systematically review the evidence regarding non-surgical management and tendon transfer surgery of patients with neurologic scapular winging due to serratus anterior (SA) or trapezius (TP) palsy.

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  • A workout for cartilage implants

    Whether arising from being felled on the soccer pitch or a seemingly harmless collision with a coffee table, a minor injury to the cartilage in your knee can have major consequences. In the worst case, the weak spot gives rise to severe arthritis and an artificial knee is the only hope. However, if the problem is caught early, further deterioration could be prevented by a patch repair.

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  • Exercise can modify fat tissue in ways that improve health—even without weight loss

    Exercise is one of the first strategies used to treat obesity-related health problems like type 2 diabetes and other cardiovascular disease, but scientists don't understand exactly how it works to improve metabolic health. To that end, University of Michigan researchers examined the effects of three months of exercise on people with obesity, and found that exercise can favorably modify abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, the fat tissue just beneath the skin, in ways that can improve metabolic health—even without weight loss.

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  • Biologic Association
  • American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
  • AANA Advancing the Scope
  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons